130 - Cleopatra1

Welcome back to Where History Meets Mystery.

 

She was a fashion icon, a military leader, and a murderer. Few women can lay claim to all three titles, but Cleopatra was no ordinary woman. Born in 70 or 69 B.C.E., Cleopatra, who ruled Egypt for 21 of her 39 years, was a woman of great beauty and style. She was also a fierce leader who craved power and control. Among many other bold actions to maintain that power and control, Cleopatra optimized her social status, femininity and charm, and pure grit to personally lead a fleet of ships into battle, organize other military war efforts, and to take part in the death of three of her rival siblings.

 

One of the most interesting facts about Cleopatra is that she had no Egyptian blood running through her veins. Cleopatra VII Theos Philopator, which translates to Cleopatra the Father-Loving Goddess, was born into the Greek Ptolemaic family who ruled Egypt after Alexander the Great’s death in 323 B.C.E.She was the second daughter of Ptolemy and possibly Cleopatra V Tryphaena or Cleopatra VI Tryphaena. Either one of these women could have been Ptolemy’s sister or cousin, it is not known for sure.

 

Even as a young girl, Cleopatra showed much promise as an intellect and future leader. She studied science, literature, philosophy, and became fluent in 9 languages, including Egyptian, which the rest of her family refused to speak.

 

While Cleopatra had the makings of a great and cherished leader, her father did not. Having allowed centralized power and corruption to flourish in Egypt, Ptolemy lost control of his dynasty and fled to Rome with the young Cleopatra in tow. Cleopatra VI Tryphaena took control of Egypt, but died soon after, some say from poison administered by Cleopatra’s older sister Berenice IV, who then assumed the crown. With Roman support, Ptolemy and young Cleopatra returned to Egypt in 55 B.C.E. and Ptolemy had Berenice imprisoned and later executed.

Come back tomorrow to hear about eighteen year old Cleopatra’s first marriage and her first taste of power.

 

Do you love a good historical mystery featuring a female amateur sleuth? Then you might enjoy the books in my Annie Oakley Mystery Series. Here’s what Kirkus reviews has to say about the first book in the series, Girl with a Gun.  

 

Bovée’s debut novel brings readers solidly into the heyday of the Wild West shows, providing wonderful details about the elaborate costumes and the characters’ remarkable marksmanship . . . There are enough entertaining elements to keep readers guessing, including romance, rivalries, jealousy, and at least one evil character from Annie’s past. The prose has a charming simplicity, which keeps the attention focused on the action and the well-developed protagonist. A quick, fun read with engaging rodeo scenes.”

 

You can find the books on Amazon.

 

 

129 - Georgia OKeeffe5

Welcome back to Where History Meets Mystery. This month, in celebration of my latest release, Bones of the Redeemed – A Southwestern Mystery, I am talking about some of New Mexico’s most amazing women in history. This week, I’m featuring a woman who is quite possibly, the most famous woman in American Southwest history, Georgia O’Keeffe.

After the death of her husband, Alfred Stieglitz in 1946, Georgia made New Mexico her permanent home. In 1949 she began traveling the world seeking further inspiration and continued to expand her abstractionist style. Inspired by her sky side view in airplanes, she created a cloudscape series, including Sky Above Clouds IV.

In the early 1970’s, Georgia began to lose her eyesight from macular degeneration, but her passion for her art and her artistic vision never wavered. She continued to produce art with the help of assistants, and also wrote her autobiography, Georgia O’Keeffe, which became a best-seller.

O’Keeffe received many awards throughout her lifetime for her dedication and contribution to the world of abstract art. In 1977 she received the Medal of Freedom from President Gerald Ford, and the National Medal of Arts in 1985.

In the Spring of 1986, Georgia died at her home in Santa Fe, New Mexico. Eleven years later,  the Georgia O’Keeffe Museum in Santa Fe was built in her honor. There, her memory lives on with 140 oil paintings, nearly 700 drawings and hundreds of additional works dating from 1901 to 1984.

Although O’Keeffe and her work broke ground for female artists around the world, she never identified herself as a “woman artist” or as a feminist. She wanted to be known only as “an artist”, an individual drawn to her craft by something within her that could not be held back or held down. She lived her life just as she wanted, with a unique passion, vision and boldness. Her work, like the woman herself, is empowered, unmistakable, and utterly unforgettable.

Thanks for listening to Where History Meets Mystery today! I hope you’ve enjoyed my flash briefings. And, if you feel so inclined, I would so appreciate it if you could leave a review at https://alexaguy.com/bovee . Reviews are the best way for me to know what listeners are looking for, and they also help to grow my listenership.

 

 

128 - Georgia OKeeffe4

Welcome back to Where History Meets Mystery. This month, in celebration of my latest release, Bones of the Redeemed – A Southwestern Mystery, I am talking about some of New Mexico’s most amazing women in history. This week, I’m featuring a woman who is quite possibly, the most famous woman in American Southwest history, Georgia O’Keeffe.

Where we last left off, Georgia had chosen to spend much of her time in New Mexico, while her husband Alfred Stieglitz had to stay in New York to manage his galleries. What resulted from the separation was another Stieglitz affair. This time with photographer Dorothy Norman.

O’Keeffe found in New Mexico solace and inspiration. In 1940, she purchased a house at Ghost Ranch, in the northern part of the state. Five years later she purchased a second home in Abiquiú. This home served as much of her subject matter through the 1950’s. In New Mexico, Georgia was prolific, creating series of paintings inspired from rock formations in the area surrounding Ghost Ranch and Abiquiu which she called “Black Place” and “White Place.”

Though her marriage was fraught with absences and tension, it endured. In 1946, at the age of 82, Alfred Stieglitz died with Georgia by his side. Three years after that, O’Keeffe made New Mexico her permanent home. In 1949, she was elected to the National Institute of Arts and letters, and began traveling the world, seeking further inspiration. She continued to expand her abstractionist style. Inspired by her sky side view in airplanes, she created a cloudscape series, including Sky Above Clouds IV.

Come back tomorrow to hear more of the story of the iconic artist of the Southwest, Georgia O’Keeffe.

Do you like to listen to audiobooks? Well, I have good news for you. The first book in my Annie Oakley Mystery Series, Girl with a Gun, is now available on Audible. It’s narrated by the amazing Susanna Burney, and she will make you feel like you are listening to Annie herself. You can find the book on Audible, or through Amazon.com. You can also visit my Amazon Author page to learn about the other books in the Annie Oakley Mystery series and to find Bones of the Redeemed. Also featured there is Grace in the Wings, the first book in the Grace Michelle Mystery Series. Here’s an awesome review of the book featured in IndieReader.

“Not one page of this captivating tale bores, whether it’s the latest scandal hitting the Follies or a glance between Grace and Chet. GRACE IN THE WINGS is the perfect blend of noir mystery, romance, action, and historical fiction, with a few comedic moments thrown in.  GRACE IN THE WINGS  is a page-turning 1920s mystery set against the smoky and sometimes seedy world of the famous Ziegfeld Follies.

 

 

127 - Georgia OKeeffe3

Welcome back to Where History Meets Mystery. This month, in celebration of my latest release, Bones of the Redeemed – A Southwestern Mystery, I am talking about some of New Mexico’s most amazing women in history. This week, I’m featuring a woman who is quite possibly, the most famous woman in American Southwest history, Georgia O’Keeffe.

While still in New York, Georgia became influenced by the movement of Precisionism and began to create the floral paintings that catapulted her to fame. During her lifetime, she created over 200 large scale depictions of flowers such as Oriental Poppies and later, her famed Jimson Weed  that sold in 2014 for over $44,000.

In 1925, O’Keeffe buried herself in this new found precisionist style and began painting a series depicting the New York skyline and the skyscrapers that formed the urban city’s landscape.

Due for a respite from the bustling city, in 1926, O’Keeffe traveled to New Mexico with a friend. They stayed with Mabel Dodge Luhan, another east-coast transplant, at her home in Taos. Mabel, with her fourth and final husband, Tony Luhan, entertained some of the most famous literary and artistic minds of their time, including Ansel Adams, Willa Cather, Aldous Huxley, and D.H. Lawrence.

While there, Georgia became enchanted with the colors and landscapes of the New Mexico desert. By 1929, she would spend part of every year in Taos and Abiquiú, much to Stieglitz’s disappointment. The relationship between Stieglitz and O’Keeffe was both passionate and tumultuous. O’Keeffe wanted to spend more time in New Mexico while her husband needed to stay in New York to manage his galleries. Another affair occurred. This time between Stieglitz and a young protégé, the photographer Dorothy Norman.

Come back tomorrow to find out what happens next in the life of the famed Southwestern painter, Georgia O’Keeffe.

In the meantime, if you are interested in learning more about me and my books, you can do so on my website at Karibovee.com. And, if you subscribe to my newsletter, you’ll receive the prequel novella to my Annie Oakley Mystery Series, Shoot like a Girl, for free! You can also find all of my books, including Bones of the Redeemed on Amazon.

Thanks for listening to Where History Meets Mystery today! I hope you’ve enjoyed my flash briefings. And, if you feel so inclined, I would so appreciate it if you could leave a review at https://alexaguy.com/bovee . Reviews are the best way for me to know what listeners are looking for, and they also help to grow my listenership.

 

 

126 - Georgia OKeeffe2

Welcome back to Where History Meets Mystery. This month, in celebration of my latest release, Bones of the Redeemed – A Southwestern Mystery, I am talking about some of New Mexico’s most amazing women in history. Last week, I brought to you the history of east-coast transplant Mabel Dodge Luhan. This week, I’m going to talk about another east-coast transplant who has become quite possibly the most famous woman in Southwest history, Georgia O’Keeffe.

In 1915, while teaching at Columbia College, O’Keeffe created a series of charcoal drawings. The drawings, depicting shapes she found in nature fused with her own subconscious feelings, showed O’Keeffe’s unique perspective of integrating art with emotion.

Unbeknownst to her, a colleague of hers at Columbia submitted the works to Alfred Stieglitz, a photographer and owner of 291, an esteemed art gallery in New York. Stieglitz exhibited 10 of the drawings at his gallery in 1916 without the artist’s permission. When O’Keeffe heard this, she wrote to him and asked that he take them down. Stieglitz refused, insisting that her art and her unique vision needed to been seen and shared with the world.

Unable to forget the work (and the woman) that moved him in such a profound way, Stieglitz arranged for Georgia to come to New York to paint. A professional, and then later, a personal relationship developed. Already married to Emmeline Obermeyer, Stieglitz fell hard for O’Keeffe, 23-years his junior, and considered her the muse he’d always longed for. While his wife was away, Stieglitz started photographing Georgia at his family’s New York apartment. Emmeline feared an affair between the two, and demanded Stieglitz terminate his relationship with O’Keeffe. In turn, Stieglitz secured an apartment and he and Georgia moved in together. It took 7 years for Stieglitz to obtain a divorce, but finally, he and O’Keeffe married in 1924.

Come back tomorrow to hear about Georgia’s venture to New Mexico, the land where she would find the freedom and inspiration she desired.

Do you like to listen to audiobooks? Well, I have good news for you. The first book in my Annie Oakley Mystery Series, Girl with a Gun, is now available on Audible. It’s narrated by the amazing Susanna Burney, and she will make you feel like you are listening to Annie herself. You can find the book on Audible, or through Amazon.com. You can also visit my Amazon Author page to learn about the other books in the Annie Oakley Mystery series and to find Bones of the Redeemed. Also featured there is Grace in the Wings, the first book in the Grace Michelle Mystery Series. Here’s an awesome review of the book featured in IndieReader.

“Not one page of this captivating tale bores, whether it’s the latest scandal hitting the Follies or a glance between Grace and Chet. GRACE IN THE WINGS is the perfect blend of noir mystery, romance, action, and historical fiction, with a few comedic moments thrown in.  GRACE IN THE WINGS  is a page-turning 1920s mystery set against the smoky and sometimes seedy world of the famous Ziegfeld Follies.